Shapeshifters 2006-2007

Lectures in 2006-2007 | Emotives – in all the possible interpretations of this word –was the central theme in 2006-2007: the world of emotions, the e-world, the dimensions of movement (physically and mentally)…

8 November 2006: Adrian Shaughnessy
5 December: Jon Wozencroft
25 January 2007: Geneviève Gauckler and Irma Boom
6 February: Erik Vervroegen
15 March: Daniel Gjode and Toffe

Adrian Shaughnessy (UK) | 8 November 2006

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Adrian Shaughnessy is a graphic designer and writer based in London. In 1989 he co-founded the design company Intro. Today he runs ShaughnessyWorks, a consultancy combining design and editorial direction. He is a founding partner in Unit Editions, a publishing company producing books on design and visual culture. The new imprints first title is Studio Culture: the Secret Life of the Graphic Design Studio. Shaughnessy has written and art directed numerous books on design including How to be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul, which has sold 70,000 copies to date. He latest book is Graphic Design: A User’s Manual. He writes regularly for Eye, Design Observer and Creative Review. He has a monthly column in Design Week, and is an occasional contributor to avant-garde music magazine The Wire. From 2006 until 2009, Shaughnessy was editor of Varoom, a publication devoted to the critical appraisal of illustration. Shaughnessy has been interviewed frequenly on television and radio. He lectures extensively around the world, and hosts a radio show called Graphic Design on the Radio on Resonance fm.

www.shaughnessyworks.com

Jon Wozencroft (UK) | 5 December 2006

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Jon Wozencroft is the founder of the audiovisual publishers touch, started in 1982 as a means of exploring the powerful chemistry between sound and visual media. Recent releases have included CD’s by Fennesz, Biosphere and Chris Watson amongst many others. He is the author of The Graphic Language of Neville Brody (1 & 2), and the curator of the exhibition of the same name. In 1990, he set up fuse with Neville Brody, a critical forum for the impact of digital media on type and visual communication. Wozencroft’s photography and design work has appeared in a number of publications, including Fax Art, Sampler, G1 and Merz to Emigre and Beyond. He was the publisher of Vagabond, and the editor/designer of Joy Division’s Heart and Soul box set. He also makes moving image work that has been showcased at Sonar, Transmediale, Avanti and numerous other festivals.

www.touchmusic.org.uk

Geneviève Gauckler (FR) | 25 January 2007

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Geneviève Gauckler is a Paris based artist who creates numerous lovable characters, blends them into everyday life scenes and turns the fantastical world into reality. She has an evident taste for simple, colorful shapes. Gauckler is all round: she designed CD-sleeves for Laurent Garnier en St Germain, titles for Arte, corporate identities (Hip), characters (Pictoplasma), and books, she made experimental videos with the collective Pleix, created illustrations for various magazines (Flaunt, Beaux-Arts Magazine, Form), set up exhibitions (Colette stores in Paris and Tokyo) and is the author of the comic book ‘L’Arbre Génialogique’.

www.g2works.com

Irma Boom (NL) | 25 January 2007

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Irma Boom is an Amsterdam-based graphic designer specialised in making books. For five years she worked (editing and concept/design) on the 2136-page book Think Book 1996–1896 commissioned by SHV Holdings in Utrecht. The Irma Boom Office works in both the cultural and commercial sectors. Clients include the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Ferrari, NAi Publishers, United Nations and Camper. Since 1992, Boom has been a critic at Yale University in the US and gives lectures and workshops worldwide. She was the youngest ever laureate of the prestigious Gutenberg Award for her complete work.

www.irmaboom.nl

Erik Vervroegen (BE) | 6 February 2007

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Erik Vervroegen began his career in Belgium. Having been crowned best Belgian creative for several consecutive years (Campaigns for Playstation an Amnesty International), he decided to leave his environment, which had become too comfortable for him. Thoroughly convinced that discomfort encourages creativity, he went to South Africa. One year working at TBWA/Hunt Lascaris was sufficient to propel him to the position of highest ranked creative in the country. He decided to follow Tony Granger to Bozell NY as Creative. In 2002, Erik Vervroegen became Executive Creative Director at TBWA/Paris and in 2003 President and Executive Creative director. In barely two years, the agency became the 2nd best creative agency in the world (Gunn Report) thanks to its excellent creative results. Erik himself has been voted 3 years running Best Creative Director in France. In 2005, the agency won 15 Cannes lions, including the Press Grand Prix and was voted Agency of the Year for the 3rd year running.

www.ihaveanidea.org/creatives

Daniel Gjode (DK) | 15 March 2007

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‘When you love what you do, do what you love, and follow your instincts, playing will emerge naturally.’ In the STUPID Studio of the Danish designer Daniel Gjøde, the main objective is to persist on having a great time, be it as a designer, DJ, visual artist and/or lonesome cowboy. Having a good time leads to results.

The presentation will feature examples from the STUPID portfolio, highlight the creative process, and clarify how they constantly try to fuse passions for music, clubbing, culture and – of course – graphic and motion design.

www.stupid-studio.com

Toffe (FR) | 15 March 2007

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‘His personal and professional nom-de-plume – Toffe – suggests a character played by Jean Paul Belmondo in a light-hearted French gangster movie. In fact, his real name is Christophe Jacquet and he’s a French graphic designer. His work, a well-kept secret in international design circles, fizzes with daring thinking and unexpected imagery; but it is his recurrent use of provocative and often jarring juxtapositions that is the most appealing aspect of his graphic design. His best work is a bittersweet mixture of ‘ugly’ computer default settings and ‘beautiful’ decorative touches; he mixes ranged-right Times New Roman with elegant filigree line work; he fuses 19th century typefaces with hybrid digital fonts. His work has the aesthetic and conceptual heft that comes from being created by someone with iron hard inner convictions mixed with a sense of humor.’ – Edited extract from an article in Eye 58, by Adrian Shaughnessy.

www.toffe.net