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Lectures in 2014 | Four designers/artists share their visions, strate­gies and expe­ri­ences on designing com­plex infor­ma­tion. Through unorthodox methods in visu­al­ising data–often obtained by cre­ating or mod­i­fying inno­v­a­tive media technology–they reveal unex­pected insights and make our inter­con­nected world more under­stand­able. Profound research always lies at the base of their thinking and designing.

12 November: Lust and Stefania Passera

26 November: Till Nagel and Benedikt Groß

Lust (NL) | 12 November 2014

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LUST is a mul­ti­dis­ci­pli­nary graphic design prac­tice estab­lished in 1996 by Jeroen Barendse, Thomas Castro, and Dimitri Nieuwenhuizen, based in The Hague, Netherlands. LUST works in a broad spec­trum of media including tra­di­tional print­work and book design, abstract car­tog­raphy and data-visualisations, new media and inter­ac­tive instal­la­tions, and archi­tec­tural graphics. Moreover, LUST is deeply inter­ested in exploring new path­ways for design at the cut­ting edge where new media and infor­ma­tion tech­nolo­gies, archi­tec­ture and urban sys­tems and graphic design overlap.
This fas­ci­na­tion led to estab­lishing LUSTlab in the summer of 2010. LUSTlab is more than a new form of Research & Development. LUSTlab goes fur­ther than observing, inventing and pro­ducing, by means of forming a plat­form where knowl­edge, issues and ide­olo­gies can be shared.
LUSTlab researches, gen­er­ates hypotheses and makes unstable media stable again. The future of dig­ital media lies in the design of its use. Humanizing the unhuman, bringing the internet down to earth and finding the missing link between the dig­ital and the phys­ical. The out­comes vary from (strategic) visions to new com­mu­ni­ca­tion tools, man-machine instal­la­tions and phys­ical prod­ucts using dig­ital con­tent.

www.lust.nl

Stefania Passera (IT/FI) | 12 November 2014

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Stefania Passera is a doc­toral researcher (MIND Research Group, Aalto University School of Science, Helsinki, Finland) and a free­lance graphic designer.
She is cur­rently focusing on the emerging topic of con­tract visu­al­iza­tion, an approach that aims at making con­tracts clearer and more user-friendly with the help of better typog­raphy, layout design and infor­ma­tion visu­al­iza­tion. The goal is not to beau­tify con­tracts, but to help the readers in making sense of com­plex infor­ma­tion. In busi­ness con­tracts, trans­parency and trust can lead part­ners in being more col­lab­o­ra­tive and inno­v­a­tive in their efforts to deliver value to the final cus­tomer. In con­sumer con­tracts, com­pa­nies can gain a com­pet­i­tive edge and improve their brand through trans­parency. In public pro­cure­ment, clearer rules can strengthen the public-private col­lab­o­ra­tion, and ulti­mately deliver better ser­vices to cit­i­zens.
Stefania has been working with pri­vate and public orga­ni­za­tions in Finland on the devel­op­ment of user-centered visual con­tract doc­u­ments, com­bining research and prac­tice. She is the mas­ter­mind behind the Legal Design Jam, an inter­na­tional series of work­shops where designers and lawyers col­lab­o­rate in redesigning existing legal doc­u­ments in a user-centric manner. Additionally, she teaches strategic inno­va­tion through design thinking and exper­i­men­ta­tion, in an inter­na­tional master course pro­vided by Aalto University and ESADE Business School Barcelona.

www.legaldesignjam.com

www.mindspace.fi

Till Nagel (D) | 26 November 2014

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Till Nagel has a back­ground in media and com­puter sci­ence. His research interest are in geo­vi­su­al­iza­tion, urban data, and inter­ac­tion design, with a focus on how to engage broader audi­ences with inter­ac­tive visu­al­iza­tions of tem­pospa­tial data.
He is a research affil­iate with the FHP Interaction Design Lab and the MIT Senseable City Lab, and cur­rently con­ducting his PhD at the Human Computer Interaction group in the Computer Science depart­ment at KU Leuven. Since 2006 he is a lec­turer in cre­ative coding and data visu­al­iza­tion, and taught courses at sev­eral inter­na­tional uni­ver­si­ties.
His work has been exhib­ited at Venice Biennale of Architecture, Shanghai Design Exhibition, DMY Berlin, and has been fea­tured in Esquire, The Atlantic Cities, and Flowing Data, among others.

www.tillnagel.com

Benedikt Groß (D) | 26 November 2014

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Benedikt Groß is a spec­u­la­tive and com­pu­ta­tional designer who works antidis­ci­pli­narily. His work deals with the fas­ci­na­tion of rela­tion­ships between people, their data, tech­nology and envi­ron­ments. He is par­tic­u­larly inter­ested to spec­u­late about these rela­tion­ships in the near future. He uses design as a vehicle to visu­alize poten­tial impli­ca­tions and sce­narios. Benedikt’s working mode can be described most of the time as ‘thinking through making’, his pre­ferred making mate­rial is soft­ware.
In 2013 he grad­u­ated from the Design Interactions course at the Royal College of Art. He received the IxDA 2014 Best Student, the IxDA 2014 Best Concept and the Excellence Award of the Japanense Media Arts Festival for his final RCA grad­u­a­tion projects, ‘Avena+ Test Bed’ and ‘The Big Atlas of LA Pools’.
He is co-author of ‘Generative Design’, which is con­sid­ered being one of the stan­dard books in the field of com­pu­ta­tional design. His work has been pub­lished in Wired, CAN, Form, Page, Weave, Infosthetics etc. and also has been exhib­ited inter­na­tion­ally at the Japanense Media Arts Festival, the Open Data Institute, Ars Electronica, V2_ & the New Institute and the Node Festival.
He now lives in Stuttgart, Germany and tries to bal­ance his time between working with com­mer­cial clients and self initiated/research projects. Currently he is also a vis­iting tutor for Digital Culture and Data Visualization at the Hochschule für Gestaltung Schwäbisch Gmünd.

www.benedikt-gross.de