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Lectures in 2016 | To what extent can nature be altered today by new and emerging technologies? How are designers anticipating the possibilities, limitations and consequences which this bold evolution implies?

Six designers/researchers reflect on how this evolution sparks fundamental shifts in their work and thinking.

12 October: Jeroen van Loon and Agi Haines

16 November: David Benqué and Cathrine Kramer

30 November: William Myers and Byron Rich

Jeroen van Loon (NL) | 12 October 2016

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“Internet is culture” was the answer Jeroen van Loon got when he asked a West-Papuan tribe member if he could explain internet. This anecdote has long formed the core of van Loon’s work.

His fascination revolves around the (non-)impact of internet. He reveals, documents and visualises digital culture. Early work focussed on contemporary digital culture, recent work on it’s future: An Internet (2015) shows a prototype for a future internet based on binary smoke signals. Cellout.me (2015-2016) questions the value of big data and future ethics by offering his full genome – 380gb of personal DNA data – for sale, for one year.

Van Loon received a bachelor in Digital Media Design and a European Master of Media Arts. He gave two TEDx talks, was nominated for the Designers & Artists 4 Genomics Award, won the European Youth Award and was awarded the KF Hein Art Grant. In 2015-2016 he presented An Internet and Cellout.me in his solo show ‘Beyond Data’ at the Central Museum in Utrecht, NL.

www.jeroenvanloon.com

Agi Haines (UK) | 12 October 2016

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Agi Haines is an artist, designer and researcher whose focus is the human body as a fabric for design. Her work mainly centers around the impact of biomedical and healthcare technologies on the future human form.

After completing her masters in the Design Interactions department at the Royal College of Art, she now exhibits, talks, and teaches internationally whilst also studying for a PhD within an interdisciplinary research group called CogNovo. Working amongst various artists and scientists exploring creativity and cognition. Within this group she researches how design may raise worthy questions regarding the dissemination and representation of scientific research. Questioning particularly how our morbid curiosity for the viscera of life might affect the future of design—not only for the environment, but also for us as the sentient sacks of flesh within it.

www.agihaines.com

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David Benqué (FR) | 16 November 2016

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David Benqué is a designer/researcher from Paris. He holds a BA in Graphic Design from the Koninklijke Academie van Beeldende Kunsten in the Hague(NL) and an MA in Design Interactions from the Royal College of Art in London(UK). His design practice aims to creatively question the roles science and technology play in society. He is currently investigating ‘prediction technologies’ as part of his PhD in Information Experience Design at the Royal College of Art.

www.davidbenque.com

Cathrine Kramer (NO) | 16 November 2016

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Cathrine Kramer is a Norwegian artist and curator working internationally. She is the co-founder of the Center for Genomic Gastronomy, an artist-led think tank that investigates the mysterious corners of the food system. Cathrine has curated exhibitions about food, strange weather and the future of the human species for the Center of Contemporary Culture, Barcelona (CCCB) and Science Gallery, Dublin. She has lectured at numerous academic institutions around the world, and holds degrees from the Royal College of Art, London and the University of Technology, Sydney. Cathrine works at the intersection of art and science, with a focus on the ecological and cultural dimensions of life on Spaceship Earth.

callmecat.com

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William Myers (US) | 30 November 2016

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William Myers is a curator, writer, and teacher based in Amsterdam. His first book Biodesign (2012) identified the emerging practice of designers and architects integrating living processes in their work. It was published by The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York and Thames & Hudson in London. His recent book Bio Art: Altered Realities (2015) profiles art that uses biology in new ways or responds to recent research in the life sciences that disrupts our notions of identity, nature, and the definition of life. Currently William is developing a new exhibition for The Science Gallery in Dublin about the potential of artificial intelligence, opening in Spring of 2017. His work has been presented internationally in lectures and popular press. More at:

www.william-myers.com

Byron Rich (CA) | 30 November 2016

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Having grown up on the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains in western Canada, where a seemingly endless wild gives way to the rapidly expanding influence of human hubris, Byron was compelled to make things that ask unanswerable questions. He pursued a degree in art at The University of Calgary before wandering the islands of the South Pacific, finally finding himself in Buffalo, New York where he obtained an MFA in Emerging Practices at The University at Buffalo. He now teaches Electronic Art, Intermedia and Painting at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania.

byronrich.com